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Location: Vero Beach, Florida, United States

My name is Pat and I live in Florida. My skin will never be smooth again and my hair will never see color. I enjoy collecting autographs and playing in Paint Shop Pro.,along with reading and writing. Sometimes, I enjoy myself by doing volunteer "work" helping celebrities at autograph shows. I love animals and at one time I did volunteer work for Tippi Hedren's Shambala Preserve.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore

Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore by Matthew Sullivan

Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher: Scribner;(January 9, 2018)
ISBN-10: 150111685




When a bookshop patron commits suicide, his favorite store clerk must unravel the puzzle he left behind in this “intriguingly dark, twisty” (Kirkus Reviews) debut novel from an award-winning short story writer.

Lydia Smith lives her life hiding in plain sight. A clerk at the Bright Ideas bookstore, she keeps a meticulously crafted existence among her beloved books, eccentric colleagues, and the BookFrogs—the lost and lonely regulars who spend every day marauding the store’s overwhelmed shelves.

But when Joey Molina, a young, beguiling BookFrog, kills himself in the bookstore’s upper room, Lydia’s life comes unglued. Always Joey’s favorite bookseller, Lydia has been bequeathed his meager worldly possessions. Trinkets and books; the detritus of a lonely, uncared for man. But when Lydia flips through his books she finds them defaced in ways both disturbing and inexplicable. They reveal the psyche of a young man on the verge of an emotional reckoning. And they seem to contain a hidden message. What did Joey know? And what does it have to do with Lydia?

As Lydia untangles the mystery of Joey’s suicide, she unearths a long buried memory from her own violent childhood. Details from that one bloody night begin to circle back. Her distant father returns to the fold, along with an obsessive local cop, and the Hammerman, a murderer who came into Lydia’s life long ago and, as she soon discovers, never completely left. “Both charming and challenging” (Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review), Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore is a “multi-generational tale of abandonment, desperation, and betrayal…inventive and intricately plotted”
I was excited about this book since the review sounded so good to me.

The first half of the book was slow and although it was setting things up I almost let it go.  But I am glad I did not! The second half of the book flew by!   It was very good!  (Albeit somewhat sad)  Some small parts reminded me of myself.. not knowing my father etc.  Sort of a sad ending, but it did tie up all the loose ends.  It's hard for me to say if you would like it or not. 




Monday, February 05, 2018

The Woman Who Walked into the Sea

The Woman Who Walked into the Sea by Mark Douglas-Home.
Series: The Sea Detective (Book 2)
Paperback: 384 pages
Publisher: Penguin UK (November 1, 2017)
ISBN-10: 140592358X



Amazon Review:
Cal McGill is a unique investigator and oceanographer who uses his expertise to locate things—and sometimes people—lost or missing at sea. His expertise could unravel the haunting mystery of why, 26 years ago on a remote Scottish beach, Megan Bates strode out into the cold ocean and let the waves wash her away. Megan's daughter, Violet Wells, was abandoned as a baby on the steps of a local hospital just hours before. As McGill is drawn into Violet's search for the truth, he encounters a coastal community divided by obsession and grief, and united only by a conviction that its secrets should stay buried.

Having read the first book called, The Sea Detective, and having enjoyed it, I thought I'd give book 2 a shot.

I was about 130 pages into this one when things were beginning to sound awfully familiar... I read on 50 more pages.  Now I felt sure I either read this before OR there are other books with a bunch of similarities .  So I donned my detective cowboy hat and dug into my blog... and low and behold ! I HAD read this book 1 12 yrs ago!..and I enjoyed it!  Of course that should surprise me since when I read the review from back then .. I enjoyed it!  duh.

So knowing I read this I contemplated ...  do I read it again?  Or do I put it down and begin another book?

When suddenly I realized, I didn't remember how this book ended!  GAH!  So I "re-read" the entire book...  and enjoyed it.  *snort*

Both the books by Mark Douglas-Home are well written and very enjoyable.. This goes on the recommended list, and no I am not saying more for a review than Amazon did!.

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

The Sea Detective


The Sea Detective by Mark Douglas-Home.
Series: The Sea Detective (Book 1)
Paperback: 400 pages
Publisher: Penguin UK; UK ed. edition (November 5, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1405923563


The first mystery in a truly unique crime series. 'There comes a time when a novel raises the bar for a particular genre, and The Sea Detective does just that for Scottish crime fiction' (Scotsman)

Cal McGill is an Edinburgh-based oceanographer, environmentalist and one-of-a-kind investigator.

Using his knowledge of the waves - ocean currents, prevailing winds, shipping records - McGill can track where objects have come from, or where they've gone. It's a unique skill that can help solve all sorts of mysteries.

Such as when two severed feet wash up miles apart on two different islands off the coast of Scotland. Most strangely, forensic tests reveal that the feet belong to the same body.
As Cal McGill investigates, he unravels a web of corruption, exploitation and violence, which threatens many lives across the globe - very soon including his own...

I liked this book quite a bit! Interesting, different, numerous good characters with good stories to them.  Once I hit about half way thru the book it got even better!  I spent most of the day (I am not a fast reader) and read the second half of the book all in a few hours.

I also liked that most of the characters are flawed in one way or another and that it took place in Scotland with mention of the Islands off of the coast. Some are real, some are not. The main island in this book is fictitious. 

There is a second book by Douglas-Home using the same main character of Cal McGill called The Woman Who Walked into the Sea.  That one is next to read.

I would definitely say to anyone who likes mysteries that this is a good one.  Fairly short chapters and easy reading.

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

The Heart of Everything That Is

The Heart of Everything That Is: The Untold Story of Red Cloud, An American Legend :  Bob Dury & Tom Clavin.


Paperback: 432 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster;(September 2, 2014)
ISBN-10: 1451654685
 



Amazon Review

An acclaimed New York Times bestseller, selected by Salon as a best book of the year, the astonishing untold story of the life and times of Sioux warrior Red Cloud: “a page-turner with remarkable immediacy…and the narrative sweep of a great Western” (The Boston Globe).


Red Cloud was the only American Indian in history to defeat the United States Army in a war, forcing the government to sue for peace on his terms. At the peak of Red Cloud’s powers the Sioux could claim control of one-fifth of the contiguous United States and the loyalty of thousands of fierce fighters. But the fog of history has left Red Cloud strangely obscured. Now, thanks to the rediscovery of a lost autobiography, and painstaking research by two award-winning authors, the story of the nineteenth century’s most powerful and successful Indian warrior can finally be told.


In The Heart of Everything That Is, Bob Drury and Tom Clavin restore Red Cloud to his rightful place in American history in a sweeping and dramatic narrative based on years of primary research. As they trace the events leading to Red Cloud’s War, they provide intimate portraits of the many lives Red Cloud touched—mountain men such as Jim Bridger; US generals like William Tecumseh Sherman, who were charged with annihilating the Sioux; fearless explorers, such as the dashing John Bozeman; and the memorable warriors whom Red Cloud groomed, like the legendary Crazy Horse. And at the center of the story is Red Cloud, fighting for the very existence of the Indian way of life.


“Unabashed, unbiased, and disturbingly honest, leaving no razor-sharp arrowhead unturned, no rifle trigger unpulled....a compelling and fiery narrative” (USA TODAY), this is the definitive chronicle of the conflict between an expanding white civilization and the Plains Indians who stood in its way.

There is not a lot I can say about this book.  Red Cloud, who it is about, is a true Hero for his people, the Oglala Sioux.  Being adopted made life hard for Red Cloud.  But in the end he won. 

Many of the Indian Chiefs that I have read about can be nothing but admired.  The didn't have to be "drafted" to go to war for their families.. they were constant volunteers. 

It is so sad how the Immigrants from Europe treated the Native American, who, by the way, was willing to share a lot of land, until the realized that all the promises were lies.  I wonder how todays Americans would feel if others took everything we had away from us how we would act.  Like Animals?  Like Killers?  Like protectors of our own?..    I swear, in another life, I must have been an Indian.

Monday, December 18, 2017

Rules of Murder

Rules of Murder by Julianna Deering.

Series: A Drew Farthering Mystery
Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: Bethany House Publishers (August 1, 2013)
ISBN-10: 0764210955




Amazon:
It’s 1931. Young Drew Fartherington and his friend Nick Dennison arrive at Drew’s home in Fartherington St. John to find his mother and stepfather throwing a house party that’s in full swing. He’s incensed to find his own room occupied, and occupied, no less, by David Lincoln, the man rumored to have had an affair with his mother. The only bright spot is the arrival of his stepfather’s American niece, Madeline Parker, whom Drew finds himself immediately drawn to.

Before the weekend is out, David Lincoln is found murdered in the greenhouse, and Drew’s mother has apparently committed suicide. But something seems wrong about both deaths, and Drew begins his own investigation, with the help of Nick and Madeline.

 
A very easy read.  I enjoyed this book. There was a good mystery to the murder(s) and along the way good introductions to the characters and their development. I would read another with the same characters.







Thursday, December 07, 2017

The Journey

Moriarty:  The Journey by Annelie Wendeberg.

Series: Kronberg Crimes (Book 3)
Paperback: 310 pages
ISBN-10: 1497392284


 

With her darkest nightmare come true and an assassin following her every step, Anna Kronberg must hurry to find the true motivation behind Moriarty's plan to use disease as a weapon. Bit by bit, she and Sherlock Holmes unravel a spiderweb of crime, espionage, and bioterrorism that spreads across continents. 

Below is a review posted on Amazon and I liked it so much I thought I'd use it so you get a total look at this Trilogy.  I enjoyed this very much. Easy reading and yet intriguing. A bit of Sherlock with a very interesting Anna Kronberg.

Annalie Wendeberg has created just such an intriguing character in her Sherlockian series, the Anna Kronberg thrillers. Anna Kronberg has taken on the disguise of a man in order to attend medical school, complete her training, and practice medicine. She remains undiscovered until she is called to perform an examination on the corpse of a cholera victim. Her secret is quickly discarded by the detective evaluating the case, the great Sherlock Holmes. So begins Wendeberg’s continuing series about Dr. Kronberg, as she helps Holmes unravel the mystery of the cholera patient and a threat of biological warfare, becomes a prisoner of Holmes’ archenemy Moriarity, and has to flee for her life from Moriarity’s murderous henchmen.
Kronberg is a wonderful character, prickly, independent, analytical, intelligent, and often unreasonable, but grounded in altruism and a deep love for her father, who always encouraged her and never constrained her ambitions. Holmes is presented as a brilliant but flawed individual, damaged by the psychological torments of his childhood, and with a mildly autistic inability to respond with appropriate human reactions to emotional situations. Much like the Mary Russell books by Laurie King, the Kronberg stories show Holmes drawing emotionally closer to his distaff companion. The male masquerade aspect of the stories is handled deftly, with a great deal of insight into what care someone like Anna must take in maintaining the illusion of masculinity, and the stresses it induces. It would best serve the reader to begin with the first book in the series, as this third volume stands alone only with some difficulty.

Sunday, December 03, 2017

Moriarty

Moriarty by Annelie Wendeberg.

Series: Anna Kronberg Thriller
Paperback: 824 pages (that's all 3 books)
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform;(August 27, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1517080223


 


Eluding Scotland Yard and Sherlock Holmes, Anna Kronberg leads aninconspicuous life far from London. Until the day she wakes up to a gun pressed against her temple. With her father held hostage and no help insight, Anna finds only one way out - to take her captor for a dance along the razor's edge while delving into Britain's tentative beginnings of espionage and systematic biological warfare.

This is the second book in the trilogy...

Anna gets abducted by the one and on Moriarty. What happens during her abduction is a bit surprising.  Having read  "reviews" on Amazon that said it wasn't enjoyable, I disagreed. I had no problem with how the story was panning out.  It is not a typical Sherlock story, and Sherlock is not the main character.  However, her writing leads to easy reading and I wondered enough what was going to happen to read it quickly.
Today I will begin book 3 and hope it all comes to a grand conclusion!

Monday, November 27, 2017

The Devil's Grin

The Devils Grin by Annelie Wendeberg.
Series: Kronberg Crimes
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform;(December 15, 2012)
ISBN-10: 1481262262


Amazon Review
London 1889. A dead man is found floating in the city's waterworks. Fearing an epidemic, the Metropolitan Police call upon bacteriologist Dr Anton Kronberg to examine the body. All signs point toward cholera having killed the man...but for faint marks around wrists and ankles.
Evidence for a crime is weak, and the police lose interest in the case. But Kronberg suspects that the dead man's final days had been steeped in cruelty. Soon, a second victim is found, and Kronberg gets embroiled in a web of abduction, abuse, and murder.
But catching a killer and staying alive would be easier if the doctor didn't have secrets of...her own.

The book pictured above is actually a trilogy in one book.  I just finished reading the first book of the trilogy, The Devil's Grin.
Dr. Anton Kronberg meets Sherlock Holmes. Together they try to solve a mystery. 
Dr. Anton is someone with secrets, that don't stay secrets very long from Sherlock. I also like that it's in "old England" about the time of Jack the  Ripper.
The story is fast reading and kept my interest.  I think the other two books in this trilogy will be enjoyable too.

Monday, November 20, 2017

The Earth is Weeping

The Earth is Weeping (The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West) by Peter Cozzens.

Paperback: 592 pages
Publisher: Vintage;(September 5, 2017)
ISBN-10: 0307948188






Amazon Review:

After the Civil War the Indian Wars would last more than three decades, permanently altering the physical and political landscape of America. Peter Cozzens gives us both sides in comprehensive and singularly intimate detail. He illuminates the intertribal strife over whether to fight or make peace; explores the dreary, squalid lives of frontier soldiers and the imperatives of the Indian warrior culture; and describes the ethical quandaries faced by generals who often sympathized with their native enemies. In dramatically relating bloody and tragic events as varied as Wounded Knee, the Nez Perce War, the Sierra Madre campaign, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn, we encounter a pageant of fascinating characters, including Custer, Sherman, Grant, and a host of officers, soldiers, and Indian agents, as well as great native leaders such as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, and Red Cloud and the warriors they led.

This book is a good source about the Indian Wars... however.. It doesn't surpass, "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee".

If I had to pick one over the other I would take Wounded Knee. 

I think this book talks a bit more of the white's side of the story compared to the Indians.  It's difficult not to take sides the more you read about what was done to the true natives of America. 

 

Monday, October 30, 2017

All the Missing Girls

All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda.

Paperback: 400 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster(January 31, 2017)
ISBN-10: 1501107976


 

Amazon Review:

Like the spellbinding psychological suspense in The Girl on the Train and Luckiest Girl Alive, Megan Miranda’s novel is a nail-biting, breathtaking story about the disappearances of two young women—a decade apart—told in reverse.
It’s been ten years since Nicolette Farrell left her rural hometown after her best friend, Corinne, disappeared from Cooley Ridge without a trace. Back again to tie up loose ends and care for her ailing father, Nic is soon plunged into a shocking drama that reawakens Corinne’s case and breaks open old wounds long since stitched.
The decade-old investigation focused on Nic, her brother Daniel, boyfriend Tyler, and Corinne’s boyfriend Jackson. Since then, only Nic has left Cooley Ridge. Daniel and his wife, Laura, are expecting a baby; Jackson works at the town bar; and Tyler is dating Annaleise Carter, Nic’s younger neighbor and the group’s alibi the night Corinne disappeared. Then, within days of Nic’s return, Annaleise goes missing.
Told backwards—Day 15 to Day 1—from the time Annaleise goes missing, Nic works to unravel the truth about her younger neighbor’s disappearance, revealing shocking truths about her friends, her family, and what really happened to Corinne that night ten years ago.
Like nothing you’ve ever read before, All the Missing Girls delivers in all the right ways. With twists and turns that lead down dark alleys and dead ends, you may think you’re walking a familiar path, but then Megan Miranda turns it all upside down and inside out and leaves us wondering just how far we would be willing to go to protect those we love.


 

Interesting.

That's the word for this book.  I did enjoy learning about the group of friends and how rumors can be so detrimental. (Something I already knew, but brought it back to the front of my mind)

A few times I felt somewhat lost but did pick it up again. I guess my "pea brain" didn't want to "go backwards" lol. 

I, myself don't think I'd want to relive a really bad time in my life, and I honestly couldn't tell if it was "freeing" or not for those involved in the book.  However, I do think I could still recommend giving this a go.  Not a bad read at all. 

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

The Heiress of Linn Hagh

The Heiress of Linn Hagh by Karen Charlton.
Series: The Detective Lavender Mysteries (Book 1)
Paperback: 325 pages
Publisher: Thomas & Mercer (June 9, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1477830081


Northumberland, 1809: A beautiful young heiress disappears from her locked bedchamber at Linn Hagh.
The local constables are baffled and the townsfolk cry ‘witchcraft’.
The heiress’s uncle summons help from Detective Lavender and his assistant, Constable Woods, who face one of their most challenging cases: The servants and local gypsies aren’t talking; Helen’s siblings are uncooperative; and the sullen local farmers are about to take the law into their own hands.
Lavender and Woods find themselves trapped in the middle of a simmering feud as they uncover a world of family secrets, intrigue and deception in their search for the missing heiress.
Taut, wry and delightful, The Heiress of Linn Hagh is a rollicking tale featuring Lavender and Woods—a double act worthy of Holmes and Watson.
This was an enjoyable read.  Good characters and lots of things happening before you finally get to the results ! As some know I also like that the mysteries / murders etc. happen in the 1800's in England. (smirk).
I've never read anything by Karen Charlton before but, I think I will try a second by her using Detective Lavender and Constable Woods.  

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Bring Her Home

Bring Her Home by David Bell.

Paperback: 464 pages
Publisher: Berkley (July 11, 2017)
ISBN-10: 0399584447


Amazon Review

In the breathtaking new thriller from David Bell, bestselling author of Since She Went Away and Somebody I Used to Know, the fate of two missing teenage girls becomes a father’s worst nightmare....

Just a year and a half after the tragic death of his wife, Bill Price’s fifteen-year-old daughter, Summer, and her best friend, Haley, disappear. Days later, the girls are found in a city park. Haley is dead at the scene, while Summer is left beaten beyond recognition and clinging to life.
As Bill holds vigil over Summer’s bandaged body, the only sound the unconscious girl can make is one cryptic and chilling word: No. And the more time Bill spends with Summer, the more he wonders what happened to her. Or if the injured girl in the hospital bed is really his daughter at all.
When troubling new questions about Summer’s life surface, Bill is not prepared for the aftershocks. He’ll soon discover that both the living and the dead have secrets. And that searching for the truth will tear open old wounds that pierce straight to the heart of his family...


 

Ok so.. this is what happens when I read one of those rare authors that really grab me from the start!  I posted my last book only 3 days ago.. but then, every book I've read by David Bell I can't seem to put down!

Bring Her Back is an excellent mystery, and Bell knows how to keep you on edge.  Though I guessed at "who done it" the anxiety held by other characters kept you consistently, on edge.

In case you can't tell.. I love David Bell's writing.  I have read nearly every book he has written!  Only one that I haven't and it's listed below.

I am sure the first book I read of Bell's was "The Cemetery Girl", and from then on it's history.  I've read all the books below except the last one.. and some day... some way.. I will get to that one too!

 

The Cemerery Girl               Somebody I Used to Know    The Forgotten Girl

     

Since She Went Away            The Girl in the Woods         Never Come Back

     

The Hiding Place

 

..and the only one I haven't read..and due to price may not get to read is: The Condemned.

 

 

I can't recommend this author any stronger.  Read just ONE of his books and you will want to read more. (They are not a series that you have to read in order). 

Sunday, October 15, 2017

The Last Bookaneer by Matthew Pearl.

Hardcover: 389 pages
Publisher: Penguin Press (1900)
ASIN: B01G3CMAGA




 

London, 1890—Pen Davenport is the most infamous bookaneer in Europe. A master of disguise, he makes his living stalking harbors, coffeehouses, and print shops for the latest manuscript to steal. But this golden age of publishing is on the verge of collapse. For a hundred years, loose copyright laws and a hungry reading public created a unique opportunity: books could easily be published abroad without an author’s permission. Authors gained fame but suffered financially—Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, to name a few—but publishers reaped enormous profits while readers bought books inexpensively. Yet on the eve of the twentieth century, a new international treaty is signed to grind this literary underground to a sharp halt. The bookaneers are on the verge of extinction.
From the New York Times–bestselling author of The Dante Club, Matthew Pearl, The Last Bookaneer is the astonishing story of these literary thieves’ epic final heist. On the island of Samoa, a dying Robert Louis Stevenson labors over a new novel. The thought of one last book from the great author fires the imaginations of the bookaneers, and soon Davenport sets out for the South Pacific accompanied by his assistant Fergins. But Davenport is hardly the only bookaneer with a mind to pirate Stevenson’s last novel. His longtime adversary, the monstrous Belial, appears on the island, and soon Davenport, Fergins, and Belial find themselves embroiled in a conflict larger, perhaps, than literature itself.
In The Last Bookaneer, Pearl crafts a finely wrought tale about a showdown between brilliant men in the last great act of their professions. It is nothing short of a page-turning journey to the heart of a lost era
.


 

Bookaneer. A review of The Last Bookaneer by Matthew Pearl produced a word new to me, one with an intriguing history. His title term refers to literary thieves of the nineteenth century who exploited the lack of international copyright agreements to publish counterfeit editions in foreign countries.

I often enjoy reading a historical novel.  I like knowing of the people being used in the novel.

I enjoyed reading this book. I have read others by Matthew Pearl and enjoyed those also.  It is not a book that I loved so much I will read it again... or a book I could not put down, but still it was interesting enough that I didn't toss it aside never to pick it up again.

I suggest you read the Amazon review and make your own mind up.

Saturday, September 30, 2017

Dragon Teeth

Dragon Teeth by Michael Crichton.
Hardcover: 304 pages
Publisher: Harper;(May 23, 2017)
ISBN-10: 0062473352


 

Amazon Review:
in the Wild West during the golden age of fossil hunting.
The year is 1876. Warring Indian tribes still populate America’s western territories even as lawless gold-rush towns begin to mark the landscape. In much of the country it is still illegal to espouse evolution. Against this backdrop two monomaniacal paleontologists pillage the Wild West, hunting for dinosaur fossils, while surveilling, deceiving and sabotaging each other in a rivalry that will come to be known as the Bone Wars.
Into this treacherous territory plunges the arrogant and entitled William Johnson, a Yale student with more privilege than sense. Determined to survive a summer in the west to win a bet against his arch-rival, William has joined world-renowned paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh on his latest expedition.  But when the paranoid and secretive Marsh becomes convinced that William is spying for his nemesis, Edwin Drinker Cope, he abandons him in Cheyenne, Wyoming, a locus of crime and vice. William is forced to join forces with Cope and soon stumbles upon a discovery of historic proportions.  With this extraordinary treasure, however, comes exceptional danger, and William’s newfound resilience will be tested in his struggle to protect his cache, which pits him against some of the West’s most notorious characters.

A page-turner that draws on both meticulously researched history and an exuberant imagination, Dragon Teeth is based on the rivalry between real-life paleontologists Cope and Marsh; in William Johnson readers will find an inspiring hero only Michael Crichton could have imagined. Perfectly paced and brilliantly plotted, this enormously winning adventure is destined to become another Crichton classic. 

I can't say I am a big fan of Crichton, but I enjoyed this book very much!  I have to admit it was mostly because it took place in the west (Indians and all) in the 1800's and he did his homework to mention what was happening with the Indians at that time. Also I did enjoy that it was early in discovering Dinosaur's.  

This is a very easy and fast book to read, and from reading reviews in Amazon, it's different from most of Crichton's other books.  So if you like the old west and Paleontologist's you will enjoy this book! 

Sunday, September 24, 2017

The House of Secrets

The House of Secrets by Brad Meltzer.
Hardcover: 368 pages
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing (June 7, 2016)
ISBN-10: 1455559490


Amazon Review
When Hazel Nash was six years old, her father taught her: mysteries need to be solved. He should know. Hazel's father is Jack Nash, the host of America's favorite conspiracy TV show, The House of Secrets.
Even as a child, she loved hearing her dad's tall tales, especially the one about a leather book belonging to Benedict Arnold that was hidden in a corpse.
Now, years later, Hazel wakes up in the hospital and remembers nothing, not even her own name. She's told she's been in a car accident that killed her father and injured her brother. But she can't remember any of it, because of her own traumatic brain injury. Then a man from the FBI shows up, asking questions about her dad-and about his connection to the corpse of a man found with an object stuffed into his chest: a priceless book that belonged to Benedict Arnold.
Back at her house, Hazel finds guns that she doesn't remember owning. On her forehead, she sees scars from fights she can't recall. Most important, the more Hazel digs, the less she likes the person she seems to have been.
Trying to put together the puzzle pieces of her past and present, Hazel Nash needs to figure out who killed this man-and how the book wound up in his chest. The answer will tell her the truth about her father, what he was really doing for the government-and who Hazel really is. Mysteries need to be solved. Especially the ones about yourself.

When I got this book It sounded like something I would really like.  And, to an extent, I did.  It was fast moving, short chapters (sometimes only 1 page!), but unfortunately it had to do with politics, history, and such. I do like history, but not so much politics and their secrets.  So although I can't say "I didn't like the book", it is one that I was glad was over and I can move on to another book.
I am sure there are those out there that would like this book very much , so I ask you to make up your own mind when you read the Amazon review.  And the fact that it moves very fast and is a quick read.
So.. onward to the next book.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Beyond the Wild River

Beyond the Wild River by Sarah Maine.
Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: Atria Books (April 18, 2017)
ISBN-10: 1501126954


 

Amazon Review
A highly atmospheric and suspenseful historical novel, set in the 1890s about a Scottish heiress who unexpectedly encounters her childhood friend in North America, five years after he disappeared from her family’s estate the night of a double murder.
Nineteen-year-old Evelyn Ballantyre has rarely strayed from her family’s estate in the Scottish Borderlands, save for the occasional trip to Edinburgh, where her father, a respected magistrate, conducts his business—and affairs of another kind. Evelyn has always done her duty as a daughter, hiding her boredom and resentment behind good manners—so when an innocent friendship with a servant is misinterpreted by her father as an illicit union, Evelyn is appalled.
Yet the consequence is a welcome one: she is to accompany her father on a trip to North America, where they’ll visit New York City, the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago, and conclude with a fishing expedition on the Nipigon River in Canada. Now is her chance to escape her cloistered life, see the world, and reconnect with her father.
Once they’re on the Nipigon, however, Evelyn is shocked to discover that their guide is James Douglas, the former stable hand and her one-time friend who disappeared from the estate after the shootings of a poacher and a gamekeeper. Many had assumed that James had been responsible, but Evelyn never could believe it. Now, in the wilds of a new world, far from the constraints of polite society, the truth about that day, James, and her father will be revealed…to stunning consequences.


Well this was a bit different, and I enjoyed it!
They kept the answers slow in coming but the rest of the story wasn't bad.  Atmospheric, and well described how a young lady is raised and expected to act "back in the day".  And then dropping them in a nearly unexplored forest where conveniences are far apart and very small. I would call it a shock to the system to go from one sort of life to another.. and still stay well dressed like they aren't in the wilds of a forest with animals and mud and raging rivers.
Not a bad book.  I read it while I had no electricity from the hurricane! 

Friday, September 08, 2017

The Sleepwalker

The Sleepwalker by Chris Bohjalian.
Hardcover: 304 pages
Publisher: Doubleday;(January 10, 2017)
ISBN-10: 038553891X



Amazon Review
When Annalee Ahlberg goes missing, her children fear the worst. Annalee is a sleepwalker whose affliction manifests in ways both bizarre and devastating. Once, she merely destroyed the hydrangeas in front of her Vermont home. More terrifying was the night her older daughter, Lianna, pulled her back from the precipice of the Gale River bridge. The morning of Annalee's disappearance, a search party combs the nearby woods. Annalee's husband, Warren, flies home from a business trip. Lianna is questioned by a young, hazel-eyed detective. And her little sister, Paige, takes to swimming the Gale to look for clues. When the police discover a small swatch of fabric, a nightshirt, ripped and hanging from a tree branch, it seems certain Annalee is dead, but Gavin Rikert, the hazel-eyed detective, continues to call, continues to stop by the Ahlbergs' Victorian home. As Lianna peels back the layers of mystery surrounding Annalee's disappearance, she finds herself drawn to Gavin, but she must ask herself: Why does the detective know so much about her mother? Why did Annalee leave her bed only when her father was away? And if she really died while sleepwalking, where was the body?
     Conjuring the strange and mysterious world of parasomnia, a place somewhere between dreaming and wakefulness, The Sleepwalker is a masterful novel from one of our most treasured storytellers.


Well.. this was a decent read.. and!...a truly surprise ending!!  You have a suspicion but you won't be right lol.
With the Hurricane almost here I am not much in a mood to write about it.. so I hope Amazon did a good job. I was good enough for me to read the book!

Sunday, August 27, 2017

An American Betrayal:Cherokee Patriots and the Trail of Tears

An American Betrayal: Cherokee Patriots and the Trail of Tears, by Daniel Blake Smith.
Hardcover: 336 pages
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.;(November 8, 2011)
ISBN-10: 0805089551


 

“The story of the Cherokee Nation is a study in suffering, displacement, and the determination of a people to carry on despite brutal government policies that culminated in the ‘Trail of Tears,' President Andrew Jackson's 1834 policy of ‘removal' that saw nearly 4,000 of the 16,000 Cherokees die on their forced migration from North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, and Alabama to the Oklahoma Territory. Smith opens his thoughtful, concise and detailed study of this brutal chapter in the age of Jackson with a stirring account of the assassination of three Cherokee leaders--Elias Boudinot, Major Ridge, and his son, John Ridge--by Cherokee political rivals…The personalities, political realities, and murderous resentments that stemmed from that treaty make for engrossing reading and a vivid evocation of how the Cherokees' options dwindled until no promising choices for this strong and cohesive people remained.” ―PW
“Is a patriot's duty to demand the absolute rights of his or her people to the end? Or is it more heroic to negotiate the best possible terms when faced with an inevitable defeat? This troubling question hangs heavy over Daniel Blake Smith's intriguing An American Betrayal, a detailed history of the Trail of Tears, the brutal forced relocation of the Cherokee people from their ancestral homeland in the southeast to the western territory that is now Oklahoma.” ―Shelf Awareness
“A vivid new history of the 19th-century Cherokee removal and the Trail of Tears. . . . The difference between Smith's account and other similar histories is the emphasis on infighting within the Cherokee leadership, who faced a difficult choice: Should they fight the forced removal by facing massive armies assembled by the American government, or negotiate the best possible terms while relocating peaceably? Neither answer was obviously correct, giving the narrative a tension that Smith develops skillfully. Cherokee leaders such as John Ross, Elias Boudinot, John Ridge and Major Ridge come alive on the page. Numerous little-known Caucasians also emerge as brave defenders of Cherokee humanitarian and land rights. . . . Well-written, well-researched.” ―Kirkus

Yet another book about Native Americans and their treatment by the Europeans that felt the land and all in should be theirs, and that the Natives should be extinguished or pushed aside.

Isn't it strange how so many of us, today, say things like, "why do I have to dial 1 for English! This is America!"... think about it.  How many, that came to America learned the NATIVE LANGUAGE?.. not many.

I don't have a great memory for what I learned in school about how the Native Americans were treated.. or why.  I am making up for it now.  But no matter what I learn, I constantly tell myself, "this is history, and we can't change history." But, I also think... I thought we all were supposed to LEARN from history and not repeat it, and make it better.  Smh. That's another thing I've learned.. very few have learned from it.. and many things never seem to change.

Amazon had good reviews of what the book is about, so I will just leave everyone with a small piece from the book....

"May 17th, 1836, the Senate approved the treaty of New Echota by 1 vote more than the 2/3rds majority required.  A week later, Jackson signed it into law. Under the terms of the Treaty of New Echota, the Cherokee Nation , by May 1838, had to give up it's lands in Alabama, Georga, North Carolina and Tennessee and leave for present-day Oklahoma. The Cherokee's had 2 yrs. to leave."

All because the Europeans wanted what the Cherokee Indians had.  Their land. During the actual Trail of Tears thousands of Cherokee died.

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Britt-Marie Was Here

Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman.
Publisher: Sceptre (1805)
ASIN: B01N1ETC6C



The New York Times bestselling author of A Man Called Ove and My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry “returns with this heartwarming story about a woman rediscovering herself after a personal crisis…fans of Backman will find another winner in these pages” (Publishers Weekly).
Britt-Marie can’t stand mess. A disorganized cutlery drawer ranks high on her list of unforgivable sins. She is not one to judge others—no matter how ill-mannered, unkempt, or morally suspect they might be. It’s just that sometimes people interpret her helpful suggestions as criticisms, which is certainly not her intention.
But hidden inside the socially awkward, fussy busybody is a woman who has more imagination, bigger dreams, and a warmer heart that anyone around her realizes.
When Britt-Marie walks out on her cheating husband and has to fend for herself in the miserable backwater town of Borg—of which the kindest thing one can say is that it has a road going through it—she finds work as the caretaker of a soon-to-be demolished recreation center. The fastidious Britt-Marie soon finds herself being drawn into the daily doings of her fellow citizens, an odd assortment of miscreants, drunkards, layabouts. Most alarming of all, she’s given the impossible task of leading the supremely untalented children’s soccer team to victory. In this small town of misfits, can Britt-Marie find a place where she truly belongs?
Funny and moving, sweet and inspiring, Britt-Marie Was Here celebrates the importance of community and connection in a world that can feel isolating.


This is a follow-up to My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry.  It follows one of the characters in that book named, Britt-Marie.
Once again this is not my normal reading material, but I found I enjoyed both of the books very much, and kept wanting to pick it up .  To anyone who read the first book (and it actually isn't a "series") and enjoyed it.. you will wind up liking this book on Britt-Marie.
I will say, for my own particular taste, and although I liked the ending, there are more things I would have liked seen happen for the ending. But everyone will have their own feelings about that.
Read these books, even if they aren't what you generally read.  They are fast reading and very much will hit your heart.

Tuesday, August 08, 2017

The Betrayal of Trust

The Betrayal of Trust by Susan Hill.

Paperback: 368 pages
Publisher: The Overlook Press;(October 30, 2012)
ISBN-10: 1468300652




Amazon:

The Betrayal of Trust. The English town of Lafferton is ravaged by flash floods. A shallow grave is exposed; the remains of missing teenager Harriet Lowther have been uncovered. Harriet was the daughter of a prominent local businessman, and her death twenty years before had led to her mother’s suicide.
Cold cases are always tough, and in this mystery in the enduringly popular series, Chief Superintendent Simon Serrailler must confront his most grisly, dangerous, and complex case yet. Susan Hill’s understanding of the human heart, her brilliance when evoking characters, and her tremendous powers of storytelling come into full force in The Betrayal of Trust.


 

Pretty good read.  Nice (very nice) short (very short), chapters!  Short chapters always make me read "just a little more" because I know I can end when a new chapter begins instead of in the middle of a chapter.

Susan Hill, is of course, most noted for The Woman in Black. (A Daniel Radcliff movie)

I have found out that The Betrayal of Trust is  just one of a number of books she has written using Chief Superintendent Simon Serrailler.  I may read another if I can come across one that is in the Thrift Shops. (Too many books here that are unread!).

This is a Cold Crime Mystery.  Very well written.  She introduces other people who seem to have no connection at all, and it seems she is telling more than one story.. but of course, she is not.

A storm uproots a tree.. along with some old bones.  (this is where you hear creepy music).. Upon  working the scene they come across more bones to a second person. Hmmm. Two dead bodies... not good.  It winds up being a 16 year old "missing person".  And it builds from there.... you will have to read it if you want to know the whole mystery!

Monday, July 31, 2017

Famous Indians: A Collection of short Biographies  by The Interior of Indian Affairs.


Amazon
Warriors, statesmen, prophets and scholars,--the firmest of friends and most formidable of foes--there are heroes and heroines of many kinds in the often tragic yet inspiring saga of North American Indians. Many of the Indian personalities whose lives are briefly described here were Chiefs--some of them have become famous around the world. All were leaders in a great struggle to preserve treasured lands and lifeways. With their tribesmen, they are inseparably linked to our country's history from its earliest beginnings through generations of growth. Biographies (most including portraits or photographs) include Powhatan, Pocohantas, Massasoit, King Philip, Pope, Joseph Brant, Pontiac, Sacajawea, Tecumseh, Sequoyah, John Ross, Black Hawk, Osceola, Cochise, Seattle, Red Cloud, Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Wovoka, Joseph, Quanah Parker, and Geronimo.


In an 8x10, double column format, this was, as they say, short and sweet.

The Biographies were only 1 or 2 pages long and yet... I read of some Famous Indians that I had not  heard of in the books I have already read.   I am finding there are so many books out on the "western Indians", that I will have to search for some on the Eastern Indians.   I have already learned there were many tribes I never  heard of because with all the killing they came extinct. Not a very nice word.. but true.

It is so ironic that in today's world we invite people from other countries to come and live here, share all we have!  When, back when man discovered America and the Indians said, "come and live  here and share what we have", the "new American", with all his greed, could not "share".. they wanted it all... and took it all.  

I read the books about Indians now... I know I cannot change anything of their past, or our past...  I just wonder why the lesson of Greed cannot be learned?

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Indian Heroes and Great Chieftains

Indian Heroes and Great Chieftains by Charles A. Eastman.

Paperback: 144 pages
Publisher: Dover Publications;(November 2, 2011)
ISBN-10: 0486296083


 

 

Raised as a Santee Sioux in the 1860s and 1870s, Charles A. Eastman (Ohiyesa) wrote eleven books in which he attempted to correct misapprehensions whites had about Indians and to bring the two races closer together.
In the present volume he offers biographical sketches of 15 great Indian leaders, most of them Sioux and some of them, like Red Cloud and Rain-in-the-Face, friends and acquaintances of the author. In vivid vignettes Eastman captures the character, achievements and historic importance of such leaders as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Little Crow, Chief Joseph, and Spotted Tail.
Enhanced with 12 portraits, these inspiring pieces will be of great interest to students of American Indian culture and history as well as to anyone who enjoys reading about the larger-than-life figures who dominated Indian life in the second half of the nineteenth century.


This book may be small, but it is mighty.

Much in the book I have read before in other books, but this is short and sweet and written by someone who actually met most of the Indians you are to read about.  You can't get anymore information then from one who was there, even if it was towards the end .

Eastman other books are sold in a collection, which I could never afford but.. there are some of them out by Dover in this small size.  There are at least 2 others I hope to get and add to this one. 

Not everyone is interested in the past of our Native Americans, but more people should be. (that's just in my opinion.)

Anyway.. loved the book.  If you are inclined to read about the Indians I highly recommend this book.

Friday, July 28, 2017

My grandmother asked me to tell you she's sorry.

My Grandmother asked me to tell you she's sorry. by Fredrik Backman. 

Paperback: 372 pages 
Publisher: Washington Square Press;(April 5, 2016) 
ISBN-10: 1501115073


















Amazon: Elsa is seven years old and different. Her grandmother is seventy-seven years old and crazy—as in standing-on-the-balcony-firing-paintball-guns-at-strangers crazy. She is also Elsa’s best, and only, friend. At night Elsa takes refuge in her grandmother’s stories, in the Land-of-Almost-Awake and the Kingdom of Miamas, where everybody is different and nobody needs to be normal. When Elsa’s grandmother dies and leaves behind a series of letters apologizing to people she has wronged, Elsa’s greatest adventure begins. Her grandmother’s instructions lead her to an apartment building full of drunks, monsters, attack dogs, and old crones but also to the truth about fairy tales and kingdoms and a grandmother like no other.

 I have to admit it, I don't remember what made me get this book. It's different from anything I normally read, but in many ways I really liked it. Parts were very sad, and with my depression I thought to put it down, but I didn't and there was only one small part that made me think of my son Thom and cry. Otherwise.. this is a good read. 

 It's mostly about a 7 year old girl that believes the fairy stories her grandma tells her. She loves her Grandmother, but shortly into the book Grandma dies. Her grandmother leaves her an adventure to do for her. It consists of delivering letters to the people in the house where she lives. One is called "the monster", who really scares her. As the story goes along you learn the other peoples lives and how they all connect to the grandmother.. honestly it was interesting, and makes you realize how well of you are in comparison. So.. yes I would recommend this book. But I cannot leave with the blurb that so reminded me of my son: 

"This gets tricky, from a narrative perspective, because the people who reach the end of their days must leave others who have to live our their days without them. It is very, very difficult to be the one who has to stay behind and live without them. "

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Crazy Horse

Crazy Horse (The Life Behind the Legend) by Mike Sajna
Hardcover: 367 pages
Publisher: Castle Books (October 8, 2009)
ISBN-10: 0785820361

    

From the Inside Flap
The northern Great Plains at the time of Crazy Horse's birth, around 1839 or 1840, were still wide-open buffalo country well known only to a few white traders and trappers. But before the Oglala Lakota war chief was two years old, the first white emigrants appeared on their way to Oregon, launching one of the greatest mass migrations in history and setting the stage for the end of the freedom plains tribes had known. Even as Crazy Horse was becoming one of the Lakota's most renowned warriors, many of his people had already given up their way of life and moved to reservations established by whites who saw them as a hindrance to progress. Those, like Crazy Horse, who chose to follow the old ways soon found themselves confronting an enemy whose might and tactics often were beyond their comprehension and whose goal was their destruction.This poignant book sheds new light on the life and death of one of the greatest Native American leaders, "one of the bravest of the brave," in the struggle against the westward movement of white settlers. Author Mike Sajna reveals Crazy Horse to have been not only an intelligent war chief with the good of his people at heart but also an ardent lover and cautious warrior who at times made mistakes and was as frightened as anyone when it came to confronting death. Sajna portrays Crazy Horse as a quiet, shy person who avoided attention off the battlefield but nevertheless inspired awe, excitement, jealousy, and fear. From his childhood when he showed courage capturing a wild horse to his first fights with the Pawnee and Shoshone, it was clear that Crazy Horse would become a fierce warrior. And yet he was also a tender man who was almost killed pursuing the woman he loved. Together with Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse led the great Sioux-Cheyenne Uprising of 1876?77, which reached its high point on June 25, 1876, with the destruction of Colonel George Armstrong Custer and more than 250 men of the Seventh Cavalry at Little Big Horn. The surrender less than a year later of Crazy Horse and his people was considered, even by his contemporaries, an epochal event in the history of the Plains Indian wars and the West. This meticulously researched biography goes a long way in separating the facts from the many myths that cloud Crazy Horse's life, while at the same time placing him firmly within the context of his times.

So... This book took me a long time to read.  Many reasons why, but one of them is NOT that I didn't want to read about Crazy Horse. 
However good and informative this book is... barely any of it tells me much about Crazy Horse.
In the beginning the author admits that information on Crazy Horse is very limited to only a few "facts" and much from old Indian lore.  Therefore, it winds up that the only "facts" are mostly in the last 3 chapters of the book, which surround his being in the fight that kills Custer, and the final chapter on how Crazy Horse dies. All other information is declared "unconfirmed".  sigh.
I was disappointed that very little is known about Crazy Horse, but if one has not read other books about Native Americans, back when White man took over then this book would be informative.
I was determined to read all the book just in case more information I had not read before might show up.  And some did.
One exciting book title showed up and when I searched it on Amazon I know I want all the information written by the author , A Eastman, on the Indians.  The main book being titled Indian Heroes and Great Chieftains. But of course I want what I can't afford! (nothing new there!) Click the link.. don't laugh too hard!

[ Indian Heroes and Great Chieftains[ INDIAN HEROES AND GREAT CHIEFTAINS ] By Eastman, Charles Alexander

Sunday, June 11, 2017

The Lance and the Shield

The Lance and the Shield (The Life and Times of Sitting Bull) by Robert M. Utley.

Hardcover: 413 pages
Publisher: Henry Holt & Co (June 1, 1992)
ASIN: B001XGEX6M



 



"His narrative is griping....Mr. Utley transforms Sitting Bull, the abstract, romanticized icon and symbol, into a flesh-and-blood person with a down-to-earth story....THE LANCE AND THE SHIELD clears the screen of the exaggerations and fantasies long directed at the name of Sitting Bull."
THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW
Reviled by the United States government as a troublemaker and a coward, revered by his people as a great warrior chief, Sitting Bull has long been one of the most fascinating and misunderstood figures in American history. Now, distinguished historian Robert M. Utley has forged a compelling new portrait of Sitting Bull, viewing the man from the Lakota perspective for the very first time to render the most unbiased and historically accurate biography of Sitting Buil to date.


After reading "Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee", this book on Sitting Bull is no surprise that it too is sad.  But, always something to learn when you read these books.

I found Sitting  Bull to be much more then a Warrior.  He was "head of a household".  He cared for all his people.  Once again the "intruders" into a land of Natural Born Americans, mistreats him and all Indians, like THEY are the intruders.  You really get a sense of how many "lies" (broken truths) the Lakota (Sioux) and others had to endure.

I truly wonder why more History is not taught in schools. It is a HUGE part of American History.  But then,... it shows how the immigrants treated them.  How the lied to them.  How the took everything from them.  Mother Earth, no longer was allowed to care for them.  They were taught to be useless and hopeless, and to have the "government take care of them".   Today it's called "welfare" and those on it are told to get off their butts and go to work... yet, back then they told the Indians, "we will care for you for all we have taken from you."..  It would seem some things never change. 

I do recommend this book. And the book of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.   I give high praise for the authors for putting out the books so others can learn of the most horrid (and seemingly forgotten) of Genocides. 



Sunday, April 23, 2017

Bury My Heat at Wounded Knee

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown.
Hardcover
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (1617)

487 pages.
ASIN: B01JXQNN28

(Book 13)

Immediately recognized as a revelatory and enormously controversial book since its first publication in 1971, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is universally recognized as one of those rare books that forever changes the way its subject is perceived. Now repackaged with a new introduction from bestselling author Hampton Sides to coincide with a major HBO dramatic film of the book, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is Dee Brown's classic, eloquent, meticulously documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the nineteenth century. A national bestseller in hardcover for more than a year after its initial publication, it has sold over four million copies in multiple editions and has been translated into seventeen languages.

Using council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions, Brown allows great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the series of battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them and their people demoralized and decimated. A unique and disturbing narrative told with force and clarity, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee changed forever our vision of how the West was won, and lost. It tells a story that should not be forgotten, and so must be retold from time to time.
 
There is not a lot I can say about this "history" book. Some of it we have heard or read about over the years.
The first 12 pages of this book is more then heartbreaking.  The people who came to this country were, in my opinion, truly "sick of mind"... sadly, some things never change.   Greed.

Quoting from the book cover:
"Traditional texts glory in our nation's western expansion, the great conquest of the virgin frontier.  But how did the original Americans... the Dakota, Nez Perce, Utes, Poncas, Cheyenne, Navaho, Apache, and others... feel about the coming of the white man, the expropriation of their land, the destruction of their way of life?  What happened to Geronimo, Chief Joseph, Cochise, Red Cloud, Little Wolf, and Sitting Bull as their people were killed or driven onto reservations during decades of broken promises, oppression, and war?
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is a documented account of the systematic plunder, of the American Indians during the second half of the nineteenth century, battle by battle, massacre by massacre, broken treaty by broken treaty.Here for the first time is their side of the story.  We can see their faces, hear their voices as they tried desperately to live in peace and harmony with the white man."

This is one of those rare books that will  have to be pried out of my cold dead hands.  That's all I can say.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Cheech is not my Real Name.. But don't Call me Chong

Cheech, Is not my Real Name ...but don't call me Chong! by Cheech Marin.

Hardcover: 272 pages
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing;(March 14, 2017)
ISBN-10: 145559234X




 

The long-awaited memoir from a counterculture legend.

Cheech Marin came of age at an interesting time in America and became a self-made counterculture legend with his other half, Tommy Chong. This insightful memoir delves into how Cheech dodged the draft, formed one of the most successful comedy duos of all time, became the face of the recreational drug movement with the film Up in Smoke, forged a successful solo career with roles in The Lion King and, more recently, Jane the Virgin, and became the owner of the most renowned collection of Chicano art in the world.

Written in Cheech's uniquely hilarious voice, this memoir will take you to new highs.

My girlfriend Cathy bought me this book for my birthday.  Cheech had been on shows promoting the book and it was being said that it was written with much humor.  I figured I needed some humor and mentioned the book and the next thing I know there it is!

The book IS written with humor. 

I can't say I followed his whole career so it was interesting to read that I knew more of his career than I thought I knew.  And still much I didn't know. It was a good story if a rise to fame and the good and bad that comes with it.  I did have one disappointment.. I knew drugs were involved with Cheech and Chong, but for whatever reason I thought it was more Chong, then Cheech.  It probably was but the disappointment (for ME.) was to hear that many still use some.  But that's just me.  I never felt that anyone needed "help" to enjoy yourself or to be happy.  To me, that's a false happiness.   So.. whatever... I still enjoyed the book and thin "Cheech" did a lot of good to make people happy.  That's got to be a good feeling for all comedians... making others happy.

Thanks Cheech.  And although you thought Cheech and  Chongs Corsican Brothers was your worst movie.. I loved it!